Climate Change

/Tag: Climate Change

Humans may be reversing the climate clock, by 50 million years

In a study published Monday (Dec. 10, 2018) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers show that humans are reversing a long-term cooling trend tracing back at least 50 million years. And it's taken just two centuries. By 2030, Earth's climate is expected to resemble that of the mid-Pliocene, going back more

2018-12-11T15:42:31+00:00Tags: |

Greenland ice sheet melt ‘off the charts’..

Surface melting across Greenland's mile-thick ice sheet began increasing in the mid-19th century and then ramped up dramatically during the 20th and early 21st centuries, showing no signs of abating, according to new research published Dec. 5, 2018, in the journal Nature. The study provides new evidence of the impacts of climate change on Arctic

2018-12-06T18:21:03+00:00Tags: |

World Bank promises $200 bn in 2021-25 climate cash

The World Bank on Monday unveiled $200 billion in climate action investment for 2021-25, adding this amounts to a doubling of its current five-year funding. The World Bank said the move, coinciding with a UN climate summit meeting of some 200 nations in Poland, represented a "significantly ramped up ambition" to tackle climate change, "sending

2018-12-03T07:36:30+00:00Tags: |

Extreme heat increasing in both summer and winter

A new study in the in Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, a publication of the American Geophysical Union, examined absolute extreme temperatures -- high temperatures in summer and low temperatures in winter -- but also looked at relative extreme temperature events -- unusually cold temperatures and unusually warm temperatures throughout the year. The new study

2018-11-27T07:01:00+00:00Tags: |

Climate Change Drives Up Rural Poverty in Latin America

Only 18 percent of the population of Latin America and the Caribbean live in rural areas, but these are increasingly hotbeds of poverty, and climate change is playing a major role in this phenomenon. Stories of extreme drought followed by flash floods that virtually destroy entire crops and wreak chaos abounded during the region’s first

2018-11-24T16:47:47+00:00Tags: |

3 Ways to Create a Climate Change Investment Strategy

The United Nations released a sobering report on climate change this month, stating that the Earth is warming faster than even scientists thought and that without far-reaching action, the planet is likely to warm to a dangerous level by 2040. Scientist have been sounding the alarm about global warming for decades, but the report hit a chord:

Responsible investment is quickly becoming a must-have advisor skill

The latest United Nations report on climate change is urging immediate action to avert a global catastrophe in the decades to come. For government, business and the general public, to ignore this warning is, well, irresponsible. The same can be said for investors, their portfolios and, even more so, their advisors. The traditional metrics guiding

Climate change and the 75% problem

Quick: Think of some inventions that help fight climate change. What came to mind first? I bet you thought of solar panels and wind turbines. In my experience, that’s what people point to when they think about reducing greenhouse gas emissions. They’re not wrong. Renewables are getting cheaper and many countries are committing to rely

Role of “natural factors” on recent climate change underestimated, research shows

Pioneering new research has given a new perspective on the crucial role that ‘natural factors’ play in global warming. The study, by Dr Indrani Roy at the University of Exeter, suggests that the natural phenomena such as solar eleven-year cycles and strong volcanic explosions play important roles in recent climate change which has been ‘underestimated’.

2018-10-12T09:42:08+00:00Tags: |

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issues warning report

Summary for Policymakers of IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5ºC approved by governments INCHEON, Republic of Korea, 8 Oct Limiting global warming to 1.5ºC would require rapid, far reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society, the IPCC said in a new assessment. With clear benefits to people and natural ecosystems, limiting

2018-10-08T07:32:23+00:00Tags: |

Large-scale shift causing lower-oxygen water to invade Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawrence

The Gulf of St. Lawrence has warmed and lost oxygen faster than almost anywhere else in the global oceans. The broad, biologically rich waterway in Eastern Canada drains North America's Great Lakes and is popular with fishing boats, whales and tourists. A new study led by the University of Washington looks at the causes of

2018-09-18T15:34:08+00:00Tags: |

Hurricane Florence Hands a Megaphone to Supporters of Sustainable Investing

As Hurricane Florence made landfall and followed a path projected to move across the Carolinas on Friday, advocates of sustainable investing sought to draw renewed attention to climate change and the benefits of aligning capital to combat a warming planet. Climate change has long been a major theme for advocates of so-called ESG investing, which incorporates environmental,

Most land-based ecosystems worldwide risk ‘major transformation’ due to climate change

Without dramatic reductions in greenhouse-gas emissions, most of the planet’s land-based ecosystems—from its forests and grasslands to the deserts and tundra—are at high risk of “major transformation” due to climate change, according to a new study from an international research team. The researchers used fossil records of global vegetation change that occurred during a period

2018-09-05T03:48:27+00:00Tags: |

Trapped Hot Water Could Melt All of Arctic’s Ice

Arctic sea ice isn’t just threatened by the melting of ice around its edges, a new study has found: Warmer water that originated hundreds of miles away has penetrated deep into the interior of the Arctic. That “archived” heat, currently trapped below the surface, has the potential to melt the region’s entire sea-ice pack if

2018-09-03T07:17:58+00:00Tags: |

Most land-based ecosystems worldwide risk ‘major transformation’ due to climate change

Without dramatic reductions in greenhouse-gas emissions, most of the planet's land-based ecosystems -- from its forests and grasslands to the deserts and tundra -- are at high risk of "major transformation" due to climate change, according to a new study from an international research team. The researchers used fossil records of global vegetation change that

2018-09-02T07:53:23+00:00Tags: |

Floods in Kerala, India, Show How Unprepared the World Is for Climate Change

The Indian state of Kerala has been devastated by severe floods. More than 350 people have died, while more than a million have been evacuated to over 4,000 relief camps. Tens of thousands remain stranded. The crisis is a timely reminder that climate change is expected to increase the frequency and magnitude of severe flooding across the world. Although no

‘Abrupt thaw’ of permafrost beneath lakes could significantly affect climate change models

Methane released by thawing permafrost from some Arctic lakes could significantly accelerate climate change, according to a new University of Alaska Fairbanks-led study. The study, which was published Aug. 15 in the journal Nature Communications, focuses on the carbon released by thawing permafrost beneath thermokarst lakes. Such lakes develop when warming soil melts ground ice,

2018-08-20T08:32:06+00:00Tags: |

Heatwave and climate change having negative impact on our soil say experts

The recent heatwave and drought could be having a deeper, more negative effect on soil than we first realised say scientists. This could have widespread implications for plants and other vegetation which, in turn, may impact on the entire ecosystem. That's because the organisms in soil are highly diverse and responsible not only for producing

2018-08-06T14:38:58+00:00Tags: |

Glaciers in East Antarctica also ‘imperiled’ by climate change, UCI researchers find

A team of scientists from the University of California, Irvine has found evidence of significant mass loss in East Antarctica’s Totten and Moscow University glaciers, which, if they fully collapsed, could add 5 meters (16.4 feet) to the global sea level. In a paper published this week in the American Geophysical Union journal Geophysical Research

2018-07-30T07:36:12+00:00Tags: |