Environment

//Environment

Lead exposure in childhood linked to lower IQ, lower status jobs, as adults

A long-term study of more than 500 children who grew up in the era of leaded gasoline has shown that their exposure to the powerful neurotoxin may have led to a loss of intelligence and occupational standing by the time they reached age 38. The effects are slight, but significant, showing that the higher the

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Chance find has big implications for water treatment’s costs and carbon footprint

A type of bacteria accidentally discovered during research supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) could fundamentally re-shape efforts to cut the huge amount of electricity consumed during wastewater clean-up. The discovery has upended a century of conventional thinking. The microorganisms - 'comammox' (complete ammonia oxidising) bacteria - can completely turn ammonia

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Extreme weather events linked to climate change impact on the jet stream

Unprecedented summer warmth and flooding, forest fires, drought and torrential rain — extreme weather events are occurring more and more often, but now an international team of climate scientists has found a connection between many extreme weather events and the impact climate change is having on the jet stream. "We came as close as one

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Should you install solar panels on your roof? Ask Google

In 2015, Google launched Project Sunroof, a map that shows which houses have enough sun exposure for solar panels to be a viable energy source. However, the original map was very limited, covering only the San Francisco Bay Area, Fresno, California and Boston. Now, Google has greatly expanded the project to cover all 50 U.S.

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The More Climate Skeptics There Are, the Fewer Climate Entrepreneurs

According to an October 2016 Pew poll, only about half of Americans believe that climate change is due to human activity. The U.S. remains home to a considerable number of “climate skeptics,” who clearly impact the politics around the issue, as they are unlikely to support costly actions such as carbon taxes intended to mitigate

Climate change to worsen drought, diminish corn yields in Africa

Nearly 25 percent of the world’s malnourished population lives in sub-Saharan Africa, where more than 300 million people depend on corn, or maize, as their main food source. Maize is the most widely harvested agricultural product in Africa and is grown by small farmers who rely heavily on rainwater rather than irrigation. The crop is

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GreenWish to Invest $280 Million in Nigeria Solar Plants

GreenWish Partners, a Paris-based independent power producer, will invest $280 million to build solar-power plants in Nigeria that are expected to start producing electricity in the first quarter of next year. A plant in the southeastern state of Enugu will produce 100 megawatts, while the company will build two others of 50 megawatts each in

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Is Spring Getting Longer?

With the first day of spring around the corner, temperatures are beginning to rise, ice is melting, and the world around us is starting to blossom. Scientists sometimes refer to this transition from winter to the growing season as the “vernal window,” and a new study led by the University of New Hampshire shows this

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Unstoppable: Why The Next Decade Belongs To Renewable Energy

The greatest challenge for mankind in the 21st century is powering the planet, while at the same time drastically reducing carbon emissions and continuing to lower the cost of energy. One year ago, GE published a Ecomagination report that examined the incredible acceleration of renewable energy development across the globe. We called upon businesses, investors and governments

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Clean energy is now as big as pharmaceutical manufacturing in the US

Across the world, myriad efforts are underway to make energy systems cleaner, smarter, and more efficient. But it’s hard to get a sense of the total size of those efforts, as they are spread across so many different industries and regions. One organization that has given this quite a bit of thought is Advanced Energy

Citizen science efforts should be scaled up

“Citizen scientists,” or members of the public who voluntarily engage in scientific work, already contribute a great deal to environmental science, but they still have the potential to do much more for regional and global assessments of biodiversity, says a study published in the journal Biological Conservation (3 November). “We have seen a wide range

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Molecular ‘leaf’ that collects and stores solar power without solar panels

An international team of scientists led by Liang-shi Li at Indiana University has achieved a new milestone in the quest to recycle carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere into carbon-neutral fuels and others materials. The chemists have engineered a molecule that uses light or electricity to convert the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide

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One of greatest mass extinctions was due to an ice age and not to Earth’s warming

Earth has known several mass extinctions over the course of its history. One of the most important happened at the Permian-Triassic boundary 250 million years ago. Over 95% of marine species disappeared and, up until now, scientists have linked this extinction to a significant rise in Earth temperatures. But researchers from the University of Geneva

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Growing Up: Vertical Farms Evolve to End Hunger

Cinder-block walls still bear Day-Glo paint murals inside the former laser tag arena that once hosted epic battles among New Jersey teens who breathlessly chased each other in a high-tech version of the incredibly low-tech game of tag. Nowadays, AeroFarms has taken over the cavernous building to operate one of the country’s biggest vertical farms.

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Caltech discovery: Water the Fuel of the Future?

Researchers at Caltech and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have—in just two years—nearly doubled the number of materials known to have potential for use in solar fuels. They did so by developing a process that promises to speed the discovery of commercially viable solar fuels that could replace coal, oil, and other fossil fuels.

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Electronic energy meters’ false readings almost six times higher than actual energy consumption

Some electronic energy meters can give false readings that are up to 582% higher than actual energy consumption. This emerged from a study carried out by the University of Twente (UT), in collaboration with the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences (AUAS). Professor Frank Leferink of the UT estimates that potentially inaccurate meters have been installed

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