Business

A living wage for garment workers without higher prices for shoppers

Here’s a novel idea: What if giant fashion brands didn’t derive a profit from pay increases for the underpaid workers making their clothes that are meant purely to bring their incomes up to a living wage? That radical notion appears in a new joint report by the Boston Consulting Group and Global Fashion Agenda, a

2017-05-23T02:14:45+00:00 Tags: , |

Why Globalcreate?

  From Trump pushing to change NAFTA, to the British electorate and their hobbling Brexit, to the tide of Islamophobia across the West, there’s one underlying commonality. The thread linking these diverse phenomena is a fear of losing one’s way of life to globalization. We are the most globalized generation in history, and every day we are

2017-05-22T04:08:45+00:00 Tags: , |

On Food Waste, The US Could Learn a Lot from Europe

Some countries are addressing food waste better than others. In many ways Europe leads the way, and the U.S. should pay attention. The U.S. tosses a staggering $161 billion worth of food every year. While numerous efforts are underway to address that problem, they are taking place mostly at the local level or in the

America has a water crisis no one is talking about

Access to clean water is a basic human right. Yet for 14 million US households, or 12 percent of homes, water bills are too expensive. And as the cost of water rises, even more Americans are at risk of not being able to pay their monthly water bill. According to a paper from researchers at

China’s Emerging Role in Social Innovation for Global Good

Remember when China was viewed in many parts of the world with alarm and suspicion? Back then, China—ruthless, relentless, rapacious—was a trade bully, currency manipulator, and a threat to international security through its belligerent posture in the South China Sea. In Africa, it was looting poor countries of their natural resources under the guise of

2017-05-10T11:51:18+00:00 Tags: , |

How Public-Private Partnerships Can Tackle Water Scarcity

North Central Texas is one of many drought-prone regions in the U.S. Fortunately, a partnership between two Texas cities and a packaging and hygiene solutions company helps conserve water in this region — and it shows how public-private partnerships can help towns fight water scarcity. Sealed Air’s plant in Iowa Park, Texas, linked up with local

300 Sustainable Solutions To Turn Global Challenges Into Business Opportunities

The Global Opportunity Explorer connects businesses to cutting-edge ideas for solving the world’s problems—and the big profits that come with those solutions. For every threat to the planet, there’s an opportunity for a company to step in with solutions. For every risk to humanity, there’s a potential business model and boost to the bottom line.

How This Radical College For Inmates Is Taking Its Program Outside The Walls

The Bard Prison Initiative drastically cuts down on recidivism. Now it’s finding ways to offering its program to people in need of education who aren’t behind bars. Nationally, nearly half of all inmates released from prison return there after committing another crime. But the recidivism rate among those who’ve earned college degrees through the Bard

Twitter could have predicted the outcome of the Brexit vote

Leave campaigners were not only victorious in the June 2016 Brexit vote but also in the battle of the twittersphere, a new study in the British Journal of Politics and International Relations reports. In the first study of its kind, researchers from the University of Surrey examined 18,000 tweets posted by the three main campaign

2017-05-03T10:42:20+00:00 Tags: |

Imagine Decentralized Leadership And A Leader Everyone Liked

After we’ve been through a presidential race during which each major party candidate employed battlefield-type management, many of us grew weary? Now, we have a president who, no matter which side you’re on, we know is going to manage in domineering ways. Imagine, for a moment, what it would feel like to be part of

2017-04-20T14:12:06+00:00 Tags: , , |

The Countries Most (and Least) Likely to be Affected by Automation

Around the world, automation is transforming work, business, and the economy. China is already the largest market for robots in the world, based on volume. All economies, from Brazil and Germany to India and Saudi Arabia, stand to gain from the hefty productivity boosts that robotics and artificial intelligence will bring. The pace and extent

2017-04-17T20:00:58+00:00 Tags: |

Your phone’s power use can give hackers an opening

As a walk through any airport will show, most people are happy to plug their phones into public charging stations, putting their phones at risk of "juice-jacking," when a compromised outlet steals data through a USB data cable. The new research looking at data theft through charging alone was conducted at New York Institute of

2017-04-18T02:33:47+00:00 Tags: |

Getting Kinky with Chickens

“Chickens versus cash” might be the “best investment” for a very narrow question, but I argue it probably isn’t in the top 100 value for money research questions in development economics. In a recent article in Vox discussing Bill Gates’ commitment to chickens as a high impact poverty intervention Chris Blattman made the following statement

Capitalism Will Shrink Inequality. In Fact, It’s Happening.

Does capitalist economic growth lead to greater inequality, or less? The mid-20th-century economist Simon Kuznets believed that at first, industrialization would lead to greater inequality as a few pioneering entrepreneurs and workers moved to the cities where the growth was happening. But as rural areas emptied out and the economy matured, he said, inequality would

2017-03-27T05:04:24+00:00 Tags: , |

Skoll | Meet the 2017 Skoll Awardees for Social Entrepreneurship

Kicking off next week’s 14th Annual Skoll World Forum, the Skoll Foundation announced the four recipients of the 2017 Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship. The Skoll Awards distinguish transformative leaders whose organizations disrupt the status quo, drive sustainable large-scale change, and are poised to create even greater impact on the world. With the 2017 announcement,

Do environmental regulations reduce employment? Not really.

There is no consistent evidence that environmental regulations cause long-term changes in overall employment. In a recent speech,  President Donald Trump made reference, as he often does, to regulations that have killed American jobs. This is an oft-used argument on the right — so common, in fact, that it is now taken as a kind

Hiding Products From Customers May Ultimately Boost Sales

Is it smart for retailers to display their wares to customers a few at a time or all at once? The answer depends largely on the product category, according to research by Kris Johnson Ferreira and Joel Goh. Retailers routinely swap out the products they display to customers. It’s called assortment rotation, and it’s a

2017-03-15T10:40:36+00:00 Tags: |