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Income inequality is going to hit tomorrow’s retirees hard

One of the mysteries of personal finance has been the disconnect between the income inequality afflicting the working public and the claims by fiscal conservatives that most people's retirement lifestyles will be perfectly comfortable. A recent post on the Squared Away blog of Boston College's authoritative Center for Retirement Research solves the mystery. There is no

Meet the Women’s Bean Project

Michelle Potter has found a sense of self-confidence for the first time since she dropped out of school at age 14. A recovering meth addict, Potter, now 42, attributes her new lease on life to the Women’s Bean Project. Social enterprise investors who look for ways to use business to solve social problems are hailing the

Employees Have Other Financial Issues That Get in the Way of Retirement Readiness

Not having enough emergency savings for unexpected expenses is the most frequently cited financial concern for Millennial (48%) and Generation X (51%) employees, while not being able to retire when they want to is the most frequently cited concern among Baby Boomers (46%), according to the 2018 edition of PwC’s Employee Financial Wellness Survey. Among

Why the Wealth Gap Hits Families the Hardest

What does economic inequality really look like? Income alone doesn’t give a complete picture. Income inequality describes the gap between a six-figure salary and minimum wage. But the more alarming gap occurs in wealth — a household’s total assets minus debts. To understand how inequality is playing out in the United States, we need to

New tech may make prosthetic hands easier for patients to use

Researchers have developed new technology for decoding neuromuscular signals to control powered, prosthetic wrists and hands. The work relies on computer models that closely mimic the behavior of the natural structures in the forearm, wrist and hand. The technology could also be used to develop new computer interface devices for applications such as gaming and

2018-05-22T19:50:52+00:00 Tags: |

Hurricanes: Stronger, slower, wetter in the future?

Scientists have developed a detailed analysis of how 22 recent hurricanes would be different if they formed under the conditions predicted for the late 21st century. While each storm's transformation would be unique, on balance, the hurricanes would become a little stronger, a little slower-moving, and a lot wetter. In one example, Hurricane Ike --

2018-05-22T19:40:36+00:00 Tags: |

Video: What is an ESOP and how does it benefit employees?

Employee Stock Ownership Plan, or ESOPs, are in focus following the Walmart-Flipkart deal with Flipkart employees being allowed to encash ESOPs fully over the next 2 years. An employee stock ownership plan (ESOP) is a type of employee benefit plan that encourages employees to acquire stocks or ownership in the company. ESOPs also help in

UK investors are bringing light to lives in rural Africa

If you have ever endured a power cut, you’ll know how hard it is to manage without electricity, even for a short while. But for over 130 million homes in sub-Saharan Africa, living without electricity is a reality. Many rural villages have no access to grid electricity, so thousands of families rely on fuels like

8 in 10 Employees Live Paycheck to Paycheck — How You Can Help Them Break the Cycle

Counting down to payday is a stressful, but all too common practice. Unfortunately, an August 2017 CareerBuilder survey found that the vast majority (78 percent) of the 3,462 full-time U.S. workers polled said they live paycheck to paycheck. This isn’t just the employees’ problem. Financial stress hurts everything from productivity and performance to morale and satisfaction at

Pesticides: What happens if we run out of options?

To slow the evolutionary progression of weeds and insect pests gaining resistance to herbicides and pesticides, policymakers should provide resources for large-scale, landscape-level studies of a number of promising but untested approaches for slowing pest evolution. Such landscape studies are now more feasible because of new genomic and technological innovations that could be used to

2018-05-18T08:10:37+00:00 Tags: |

Gains in Financial Inclusion, Gains for a Sustainable World

Mary Banda in Zambia runs a small restaurant in one of Lusaka’s oldest markets. Before she learned that financial services could make the way she did business easier, her profits were low. But today, her profits have increased, both because she banks her money and because she uses mobile money transfer services. Using financial services has

Every Google search results in CO2 emissions.

Every Google search comes at a cost to the planet. In processing 3.5 billion searches a day, the world’s most popular website accounts for about 40% of the internet’s carbon footprint. Despite the notion that the internet is a “cloud,” it actually relies on millions of physical servers in data centers around the world, which are connected

How social movements are becoming part of corporate life

As #MeToo bloomed into a fully formed social movement in late 2017, PricewaterhouseCoopers’ D.C. office gathered for a meeting. The staff of the professional services firm had already received an email from U.S. Chairman and Senior Partner Tim Ryan in the days following a New York Times story revealing decades of sexual harassment complaints against Hollywood producer

Can we get 100 percent of our energy from renewable sources?

In a review paper last year in the high-ranking journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Master of Science Benjamin Heard and colleagues presented their case against 100% renewable electricity systems. They doubted the feasibility of many of the recent scenarios for high shares of renewable energy, questioning everything from whether renewables-based systems can survive extreme

2018-05-18T08:07:21+00:00 Tags: |

Not quite a ‘double bind’ for minority women in science

Many studies have shown that both minority and women scientists face disadvantages in reaching the highest levels of their careers. So it would make sense that minority women would face a “double bind” that would particularly disadvantage them. But a new study using a massive database of scientific articles suggests that minority women actually face

Satellite Study Finds Major Shifts in Global Freshwater

A new global, satellite-based study of Earth's freshwater distribution found that Earth's wet areas are getting wetter, while dry areas are getting drier. The data suggest that this pattern is due to a variety of factors, including human water management practices, human-caused climate change and natural climate cycles. The NASA-led research team, which included Hiroko

2018-05-18T07:48:41+00:00 Tags: |

Fewer Americans Delaying Major Life Events Because of Money Worries

The recent recession caused Americans to face some hard economic realities. As the economy continues to recover, more Americans are taking their lives off hold as fewer are being forced to delay going to college, getting married or having kids because of financial concerns. A new survey found that the number of American adults that